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Museum Hours
Thurs: 1 PM–8 PM
Fri–Mon: 10 AM–5 PM
Tue–Wed: Closed
Cafe Hours
Fri-Mon: 10 AM—4:30 PM
Thurs: 1—7:30 PM
Location
200 Larkin St.
San Francisco, CA 94102
415.581.3500
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Education Topic

Looking at Art

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Background Information

The Ukiyo-e (Woodblock) Printing Process

Woodblock printmaking was a complex process involving the collaboration of several people: publisher, artist, carver, and printer.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12)

Background Information

The Development of Landscape Painting in China: The Song (960–1279) through the Ming (1368-1644) Dynasties

Invasions in the north by the Jin Tartars in the 12th century forced the Song dynasty to retreat to the south where a new court was established at Hangzhou in 1127. Under the Emperor Hui Zong the Imperial Painting Academy already was moving in the direction of closer views of nature, both in landscapes and in images of birds, flowers, and insects. The intent was to capture the vital life spirit of these subjects as well as an understanding of their true form, texture, and movement in space.

GRADE LEVEL: High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Background Information

Tibetan Thangka Painting (Sacred Pictures)

In Tibet, religious paintings come in several forms, including wall paintings, thangkas (sacred pictures that can be rolled up), and miniatures for ritual purposes or for placement in household shrines.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Artwork

Throne for a Buddha image, 1850–1900

Throne for a Buddha image, 1850–1900. Burma. Lacquered and gilded wood and metal with mirror inlay. Gift from Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s Southeast Asian Art Collection, 2006.27.1.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Artwork

Theatrical headdress for the magical deer

Theatrical headdress for the magical deer in the Story of Rama dance-drama, approx. 1950–1960, Central Thailand. Papier-mache, glass, and mixed media. Gift from Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s Southeast Asian Art Collection, 2006.27.10.9.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Artwork

The Urami Waterfall in Niko, 1853

The Urami Waterfall in Niko, Picture of Famous Places in the Sixty-odd Provinces, August, 1853, by Ando Hiroshige (Japanese, 1797 – 1858), Woodblock print; Ink and colors on paper, Gift of Japanese Prints from the Collection of Emmeline Johnson. Donated by Oliver and Elizabeth Johnson, 1994.48. Photograph © Asian Art Museum of San Francisco.

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Lesson

The Spread of Buddhism Across Asia

Trace the spread of Buddhism through close looking at Buddhist objects from different regions. Explore how artifacts reveal distinct local traditions as well as common ideas and motifs.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8)

Activity

The Ricci Map, 1602 (interactive)

Explore this interactive map. Zoom-in on high resolution details and discover English translations of the classical Chinese text and synopsis by scholars.Explore this interactive map.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Video

Masterpiece: Ewer with Lid

This lustrous stoneware vessel is a ewer, or pitcher, dating to the early 1100s, during Korea’s Goryeo dynasty (918–1392). It was probably used for wine, which may have been warmed by placing the ewer in a matching bowl of heated water. The ewer’s color is called celadon, which is created by a glaze that includes iron oxide. Today, connoisseurs around the world continue to treasure Goryeo celadon as among the most precious items created by Korean artisans.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond