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Museum Hours
Thurs: 1 PM–8 PM
Fri–Mon: 10 AM–5 PM
Tue–Wed: Closed
Cafe Hours
Fri-Mon: 10 AM—4:30 PM
Thurs: 1—7:30 PM
Location
200 Larkin St.
San Francisco, CA 94102
415.581.3500
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Region

Asian America

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Lesson

“Relocation”–Understanding Location and Place

Students will 1) learn the difference between location and place; 2) identify the location and place characteristics of different cities; and 3) reflect on the effects of a sudden change in location and place on the Japanese Americans when they were forced to evacuate and relocate.

GRADE LEVEL: Early Elementary School (K-3), Elementary School (4-5)

Activity

Asian American Neighborhood Illustrated Map Activity

Share your favorite spots in your city’s Chinatown, Japantown, Koreatown, Manilatown, Little Saigon, or Little Delhi. Some Asian American communities might not have names like these, but they can be mapped just the same to show what makes them special.

GRADE LEVEL: Early Elementary School (K-3), Elementary School (4-5), Middle School (6-8)

Teacher Packet

Jade Snow Wong

The lessons below increase in the level of analytical thinking required of the students, with Lesson 1 being accessible to all grade levels and the final lesson, Lesson 5, being more appropriate for Grades 9-12+.

GRADE LEVEL: Early Elementary School (K-3), Elementary School (4-5), Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12)
Download PDF (Free)

Video

Hip Hop to Hamilton: Making Art Work

Please join Khafre James, executive director of Hip Hop for Change, and Lily Ling, music director and conductor for the And Peggy North American Tour of “Hamilton”, for a discussion on art in the post-COVID-19 world.

GRADE LEVEL: Early Elementary School (K-3), Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Video

Zine Workshop with Art Speak Youth

Creating opportunities for youth involvement at the Asian Art Museum, Art Speak engages young artists ages fourteen to eighteen who are interested in Asian art and culture, enjoy exploring new and different ideas, are self-motivated and independent but work well with others, and feel comfortable interacting with the public. From manga to Ming to samurai, Art Speak is a dynamic program that grows from year to year with each season offering new and exciting opportunities for creation and collaboration.

GRADE LEVEL: High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Video

Noguchi and Hasegawa in Their Own Words

Discover how two artists seeking a new direction for modern art in the aftermath of World War II found inspiration in Japanese tradition. Trace the friendship, work, ideas and mutual influence of Isamu Noguchi and Saburo Hasegawa, who both sought to balance tradition and modernity, Japanese culture and foreign influences, past and present.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Video

A Conversation with Sanjay Patel

Asian Art Museum Art Speak interns have a conversation with artist and animator Sanjay Patel.

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond

Activity

Assembling Personal Narrative

Students will: 1.) Observe and discuss how artist Santiago Bose uses cultural symbols and artistic methods as post-colonial critique. 2.) Create an assemblage using found objects that conveys their personal identities. 3.) Interview a family member to uncover a photograph or symbol that recalls their heritage and include this in their assemblages. 4.) Write a first person narrative telling a story about their assemblages.

GRADE LEVEL: Elementary School (4-5), Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12)

Background Information

Houston Asian American Archive (HAAA)

Search Houston Asian American Archive (HAAA) for oral histories, letters, diaries, photographs, newspapers and other records.

GRADE LEVEL: Early Elementary School (K-3), Elementary School (4-5), Middle School (6-8), High School (9-12), College and Beyond